Posts tagged ‘how-to’

September 21, 2012

Corny!

I love saving summer sweet corn for use in the long winter months!  Cutting corn off the cob can be tricky, messy and dangerous, but years ago my grandma gave me a genius tip that takes care of all that.  Grab yourself some blanched sweet corn {put ears of corn in boiling water for 5-6 minutes, then immediately put it into ice water to cool} and an angel food cake pan and take a look at this video!

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June 6, 2011

Gardening Edition: Pruning your tomato plants

At best, I’m a gardening rookie; a novice; a wanna-be.  I’m trying to always learn new stuff, but I’ve never been a great studier, so I get overwhelmed learning too much at once.  That’s why a recent “field trip” was perfect for me!  The kids and I went with my mom to her friend C.P.’s  house – she has many, many chickens and huge gardens.  That morning C.P. and her husband had planted 150 tomato plants in their garden…and still had a TON of plants {that they had grown under grow lights in their basement} that they were now selling off.  I was excited to try some of their many varieties like green sausage, black krim, black plum, 2 kinds of romas, big beef hybrid, yellow pear, large red cherry, delicious, gardener’s delight, triple crop climber {the plant can grow 10-25 FEET tall and grows tomatoes as big as your face!}, and one other that I can’t remember right now.  While picking out my tomatoes, C.P. gave me a quick lesson in pruning tomato plants.  Pruning?  Who knew??  Anyway, whenever you see a little leaf shooting out of the crook like this:

{Sucker!}

you need to pick off the “sucker branch” below it.  The sucker will not bear fruit and will essentiall suck all the nutrients from the fruit-bearing “branches”.  Don’t want that now, do we?

{pick that sucker}

I did this with all my tomato plants.  At first they looked tall, skinny, and funny. 

{A little topheavy...}

 But have no fear!  Those fruit-bearing “branches” will grow and fill out.  And the best part is, you’ll get lots of tomatoes!

{filling out nicely}

 Maybe this is all Gardening 101, but I grew several tomato plants {semi-successfully} last season without having a clue about pruning them.  Now I’m hoping for a large crop that’ll give me plenty to can and make salsa with.  I saw the first sign of produce progress with some bright yellow blossoms today – yay!

{I see lycopene in my future}

 And, just for fun, here are a few other photos from the garden…

{my newly constructed pea trellis}

{emerging fiesta - black beans!}{tiny little carrot sprouts}{doesn't look much like spinach yet, does it?}{itty bitty bells - peppers, that is}

Posted in My {un}Perfect Garden | 1 Comment »

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February 7, 2011

Make It Monday: Felt and Fabric Flower Rosettes

Here they are, folks!  The tutorials for felt rosettes and fabric rosettes.  They’re very, very similar, but I’ll go through them each, step-by-step.

FELT FLOWERS

Materials:
1.5″ x 11″ strip of felt {this doesn’t need to be exact}
Glue gun/glue sticks or needle/thread
Embellishment for center {bead, rhinestone, pearl, button, etc.}

1} Dog-ear the corner of one end of the felt and secure with a dot of hot glue
2} Fold long end down over the dog-eared corner
3} Twist strip and fold over.  Continue this step to form a closed circle
4} Continue twisting and folding over, making sure to make the second larger circle behind the first circle
5} Glue the end to the back of the rosette to secure
6} Glue “petals” in several spots to secure the rosette, ensuring it doesn’t unravel
7} Glue your embellishment to the center of your rosette
8} Use your creativity and attach your sweet little rosette to whatever you come up with!  Hair clip, headband, shirt, handbag, pillow…whatever you’d like

{I start with a standard 8.5 x 11 piece of felt - $0.29 at Michael's}

{cut about a 1.5" piece the long way on the felt}

{dog-ear the corner}

{fold the long end over the dog-earred corner}

{twist and fold}

{twist and fold until you have a small closed circle--no hole in the center}

{when starting the second bigger circle, tuck behind the first circle}

{almost finished!}

{embellish!}

{or like this. I have a stash of gorgeous vintage buttons that I just can't wait to use}

{this one's more understated}

{last one, I promise!}

 FABRIC ROSETTE

Materials:
Fabric {I love to use fat quarters}
Glue gun/glue sticks or thread/needle
Embellishments {same as above}

1} Cut or rip {ripped gives a more “shabby” look} a 1″ +/- strip of fabric – the longer the strip, the bigger the flower
2} tie a knot at the end of the strip
3} Fold the end over and glue to the knot
4} Twist the strip and wind it around the knot, securing every so often with glue
5} Continue to twist and wind until you have about an inch of a tail left.  Glue the tail to the back side of the rosette to provide stability to the rosette
6} Finish off your rosette with the embellishment of your choice
7} Finally, add your rosette to whatever you want, just like with the felt flowers.  These little cuties are so versatile! 
*} If your strip isn’t as long as you’d like it, you can either glue or tie two strips together.  Instant long strip!

{start with a cut}

{let it rip!}

{tie it up}

{fold and glue}

{twist, wind and glue}

{now we're getting somewhere}

{cute little tail}

{glue it around back}

{add an embelly and you're done!}

I’m loving these sweet little rosettes and I’m having fun thinking of ways to use them.  How do you think YOU’LL use them??

Posted in {un}Perfect Projects | 3 Comments »

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